Tesla Giga Berlin will save company from Shanghai export ‘nightmare’: Wedbush

Credit: @Gf4Tesla/Twitter

Tesla Giga Berlin will be the electric automaker’s savior in a “logistical nightmare” that requires the company to ship cars from China to Europe, Wedbush analyst Dan Ives said in a note this morning.

Earlier today, Tesla CEO Elon Musk stated that he expects Giga Berlin, the company’s first European production facility, to start assembling cars in just two months. “We’re hoping to get the final approval in October. Or ‘Oktoberfest.’ An ‘Oktoberfest’ approval,” Musk said.

The sooner Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) can get the Berlin factory up and running, the sooner it can free itself of the import of vehicles to Europe from Shanghai, a process that is “not sustainable,” according to Wedbush analyst Dan Ives, a Tesla bull who has a “Buy” rating on the company’s stock with a price target of $1,000.

Tesla Giga Shanghai. (Credit: Tesla)

The inclusion of the Berlin factory into Tesla’s production spreadsheet increases the company’s annual assembly rate, which the company continues to do on what seems like a quarterly basis. According to MarketWatch, Ives wrote in the note to investors that the opening of the factory is “a positive step on expanding Tesla’s broader manufacturing capacity globally.”

However, in Ives’ analysis, the more crucial portion is that Tesla will no longer have to import vehicles from China to Europe. A move that the company intended on never taking, Tesla sent China-made Model 3 units to Europe in January for the first time. The strategy has increased the company’s presence in the EV-savvy region of Europe but has also decreased deliveries in China, where the sector is growing. Tesla in no way has a negative track record in China and has sold its vehicles extremely well there. However, the absence of a European assembly facility has forced the company to split its Chinese production lines between domestic and foreign regions, which Musk detailed in a Tweet yesterday.

“Tesla makes cars for export in first half of quarter & for local market in second half,” Musk said, before detailing production delays due to supply chain limitations.

Ives is ready for Tesla to move on from Giga Shanghai being looked at as an export hub, as he called the process “a logistical nightmare that is not sustainable and thus pushing back delivery times for customers throughout the region.”

Bullish on the outlook of Tesla, Ives sees Berlin and Tesla’s upcoming Austin, Texas, plant as the two key manufacturing hubs that could contribute to the company’s success. As capacity and supply issues remain as the biggest concern for Tesla moving forward, demand certainly is not in Ives’ opinion. Berlin and Texas “will be key in the long term Tesla EV story as we see down the road the company producing millions of EV vehicles per year vs. roughly (870,000 and 900,000) this year.” he said.

Ives is ranked 27th out of 7,623 analysts on TipRanks and has a 76% success rate with an average return of 35.9%.

Disclosure: Joey Klender is a TSLA Shareholder.

Joey Klender: Transportation Writer | Penn State Alum | Future World Series of Poker Bracelet Holder 🚀 🛰 ☀️ 🚘 🧠 🕳
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