Tesla who? Bill Gates refuses to mention EV leader in blog post

Tesla has done more than any other company to accelerate the transportation movement toward electrification. By introducing the Model S in 2012, Tesla proved electric cars could be fast and exciting and sustainable at the same time. However, Tesla’s notable surge in popularity over the past few years wasn’t enough to convince Bill Gates to mention the company in his most recent blog post. Instead, he chose to credit legacy carmakers GM and Ford, and new kids on the block Rivian and Bollinger, leaving Tesla as a forgotten and unmentioned despite its much-deserved notoriety when talking about electric vehicles.

In a blog post on GatesNotes.com, the former Microsoft frontman talked about the struggle between traveling and contributing to global climate change. While moving and exploring is a part of life, the use of cars that are powered by petrol are contributing to the influx of emissions that are poisoning the Earth’s atmosphere.

Gates, who is a known supporter of electric vehicles, drives Porsche Taycan. The product of a prestigious private college in Massachusetts, known as Harvard, was more than willing to express his gratitude for the companies that are assisting in the surge toward cleaner transportation.

While electric sedans have been available for several years across a variety of car companies, pickup truck designs are rare. While the sustained focus on small passenger vehicles has subsided slightly in favor of crossovers and SUVs, other car companies are working on all-electric pickups, which would be a valuable contribution to the American automotive market.

“You’ll even be able to buy an all-electric pickup truck soon thanks to legacy companies like GM and Ford and new carmakers like Rivian and Bollinger,” Gates said. However, he left out the one company that has a sizeable lead in the EV sector, according to some of its competitors: Tesla.

Interestingly enough, Gates even talked about the widespread availability of EV batteries, which is a much-improved topic compared to 2010. Gates said that the price of battery cells has dropped 85% since that year, “so they’re getting more affordable to purchase,” he added.

However, the most bang for your buck in terms of EVs and battery quality is Tesla, which makes it interesting that Gates would leave out such a large contributor to the very subject his blog post was focused on.

The reason for leaving Tesla out of the conversation is unknown. However, Gates has been vocally critical of Musk in the past, especially when concerning the Tesla CEO’s comments about the coronavirus. Gates said that he hoped Musk would not “confuse areas he’s not involved in too much,” in an interview with CNBC.

However, Musk is involved in the fight against the pandemic, as he has donated ventilators, developed his own in-house breathing system using Tesla auto parts, and has worked with pharmaceutical companies to build RNA printers that could assist in the development of a vaccine.

Leaving Tesla out of the conversation when talking about electric vehicles is like leaving out Microsoft when talking about computers. Tesla is the company that has made electric cars mainstream and has convinced other car companies that it is time to move away from gas-powered automobiles. Some of the largest companies in the world admit that Tesla is years ahead of everyone else, and for a good reason. The company was building EVs before the public widely accepted it.

Gates’ full blog post is available here.

Joey Klender: Transportation Writer | Penn State Alum | Future World Series of Poker Bracelet Holder 🚀 🛰 ☀️ 🚘 🧠 🕳
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