Model 3

Tesla Model 3 emergency response guide provides in-depth look at vehicle chassis and composition

Tesla released the Model 3 Emergency Response Guide, providing an in-depth look into the full makeup and chassis composition of the Model 3, detailed safety features, and information on how to properly cut the vehicle open in the event of a major crash.

The guide is specifically crafted for first responders arriving at the scene of a crash or emergency involving a Model 3. Its table of contents shows several subsections regarding air bags, high voltage components, what to do if the vehicle is submerged, and how to fight a fire inside the Model 3.

Notably, the Model 3, like the Model S and Model X, should be treated as any other Tesla when submerged or partially submerged. It reminds first responders that the Model 3 is no greater risk of electric shock than any other vehicle.

“The body of Model 3 does not present a greater risk of shock because it is in water. However, handle any submerged vehicle while wearing the appropriate PPE. Remove the vehicle from the water and continue with normal high voltage disabling,” the report reads.

Once removed from water, the report provides a detailed look on how to cut cables to disable the high voltage components of the vehicle.

One area where the battery could pose a different risk from internal combustion engine vehicles is in firefighting. The report details that a battery fire should be put out with only water, and that it could take up to 3,000 gallons of water to ensure the fire is out.

“It can take approximately 3,000 gallons of water, applied directly to the battery, to fully extinguish and cool down a battery fire; always establish or request an additional water supply. If water is not immediately available, use dry chemicals, CO2, foam, or another typical fire-extinguishing agent to fight the fire until water is available,” the report reads.

In addition to this information, the guide also features designs of the primarily high-strength and ultra high-strength steel chassis for the vehicle and areas deemed “no cut zones.” This specific information is for first responders who may need to cut the vehicle open for extraction and rescue of people trapped inside.


The “no cut zones,” designated in the diagram with a pink color, should be avoided because of high voltage, gas and other hazards that may exist in that area of the vehicle. The other reinforced steel areas of the car are recommended cut zones used for dismantling.

We previously saw Model 3’s strategic blend of aluminum, mild steel, high-strength and ultra high-strength steel used in various layers and sections of the vehicle’s chassis, as illustrated in the Model 3 Body Repair Tech Note.

Details regarding the location of Model 3 VIN numbers and other information (jack points, airbag locations, etc.) to be used in the scene of an accident is outlined in the Tesla Model 3 Emergency Response Guide.

Tesla Model 3 emergency response guide provides in-depth look at vehicle chassis and composition

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